About Us

The EMBER Project Is About

Learning Designed for Humans



I started the EMBER Project blog in 2011 while working in a remote rural hospital as a way to rekindle my love of learning, and to stay connected with other FOAM educators around the globe. I was inspired by the emerging online FOAM content out there, and in the process of creating my blog, I had the revelation that somewhere during my medical education I had forgotten an essential truth at the heart of being a physician:

That we must be inspired to learn, because what we learn has the potential to help others.

Now as a physician educator who teaches and practices emergency medicine in New York city, I realize more than ever how important  it is to continue striving for better ways to share our collective knowledge. If we want to keep pace with rapid change across the arc of our careers, and pass what we know on to the next generation of physicians we must put more energy into the process of how we learn and not only on what we learn. In short, we need to create medical education that is learning designed for humans.

Learning for Humans_ Searching for the Heart of Medical Education-2.002

Since 2011 The EMBER Project has developed into a larger experiment on improving medical education through better education design: experimenting with the use of simulation, 3D printing, social media, and other tools to build medical education that embodies the  principles of “learning for humans.”

We also bundle great FOAM content and highlight the educators who create it in order to acknowledge the best and the brightest physician educators out there who excel at education design – offering inspiration to those walking in their footsteps.

Somewhere out there is an ideal world where medical education has no geographic or institutional boundaries, where learning can become a rewarding lifestyle, where content fits your specific needs, where people share their knowledge and experience freely, and where feet don’t hurt at the end of a shift.  Somewhere out there is a collective wisdom about our daily clinical practice that brings us all closer together, working for the common cause of being better, wiser, and happier caregivers.