The EMBER Project

Download, bookmark, aggregate, follow & create for a happy new year!

The holidays are over and with it 2015 is coming to a close. One of the missions of the EMBER Project is to help you organize your flow of information so that it’s relevant and accessible when you need it. Here are four skills and some tools we’ve come across in 2015 that will help you learn, teach, and grow as a physician and an educator.


 

Download

screen568x568ACEP Toxicology Section Antidote App – By American College of Emergency Physicians.

Some information can be stored in the cloud or your hard-drive for leisurely review. When taking care of your critically ill patients there is some information that can’t be left to a Google search. Mobile apps are still useful when you want critical information at your fingertips that is easy to access and trustworthy. The ACEP Antidote app is one of those. and will be on my iPhone in 2016.


 

Bookmark

dded87_3069f29a335c688a8b97789585bc1d89Critical Appraisal Skills Programme (CASP) – Making sense of evidence. 

Industry funded research, profit motive and competing interests that don’t always align with patient or public health interests make critical appraisal of the medical literature  a top priority The developers of this site from Oxford have developed workshops and tools for learning how to critically appraise medical research.


Follow

icontexto-inside-twitterI use Twitter as my tool to network and to organize the flow of EM relevant news, research, opinion and just plain interesting voices.  Here are a couple of the breakout voices I’ve been following in 2015 and will be watching for in 2016

@AirwayNauts By Jim DuCanto & Friends.

Those involved in the solemn deliberate study and practice of navigating, sailing, exploring, and innovating airway management are known as “AirwayNatics”.

@brennafarmer1 One of my smartest friends; wears more hats well than anyone I know.

Medication Safety, Patient Safety, Emergency Medicine, Toxicology expert.

@jameshorowitzmd  Jim is my go to guy for advanced VTE care in sick patients. I expect many great insights from him in 2016

Cardiac Critical Care. Co-Director Pulmonary Embolism Advanced Care team 

If you want to see the complete list of who I follow on Twitter in Emergency Medicine here it is. Feel free to pick and choose for a great stream of information. Then add it to one of the apps below!


Aggregate

News aggregators like Feedly help you collect, follow and share the many streams of information into one place, and are your lifeline for keeping track of it all.  Here are the one’s I liked most in 2015 and will continue to use in 2016.

flipboardNYCFlipboard aggregates articles, video, podcasts, and social media into a beautiful and mobile, print-style digital magazine. With it’s browser widget and other tools it makes collecting and sharing news  easy. In addition it allows you to create and curate your own magazines with multiple editors if you.  By far my favorite aggregator.

pocket-appThe one thing Flipboard doesn’t do is allow for collecting for offline reading. For this I use Pocket. A great tool if what you are looking to do is “clip” an article, video, or other content for later.

 


 

Create

311605691_640In 2015 I hosted an innovation in medical education Design Challenge where I encouraged our residents and many of my expert colleagues to free their lectures from their hard-drives, and find easy and creative ways to translate their knowledge from powerpoint slides into more accessible and visually appealing alternatives.

One of my favorite tools of 2015 was Haiku Deck, it’s a wonderful alternative to Powerpoint.  Here are a few decks I made in 2015. I’m sure I’ll be making more in 2016.


 

That’s it for us at the EMBER Project this year. Happy New Year!!

 

Maintaining your learning stream (your customized flow of educational content) is a key part of being an  effective lifelong learner. Even in the age of FOAM the center of your learning network can become heavily weighted towards just a few resources; which is why taking the time to search periodically for new ones should be as routine as cleaning your hard drive.

Content sources within the FOAM universe are of course easier to find, but this can become a self-referential system, and so I try to spend time periodically looking for relevant but unusual places with new learning.  The Autopsy Center of Chicago blog is one of those.

Autopsy rates have declined dramatically in recent decades, and the valuable feedback they provide for clinicians has declined with them. According to the CDC, overall autopsy rates have dropped more than 50 percent since 1972. That number gets worse if you look just at autopsies performed for disease related deaths.

While autopsy rates may be declining, in a hashtag world, the potential knowledge to be gained from them doesn’t have to. The Autopsy Center of Chicago has a blog that presents interesting monthly cases, and offers a view into the pathologist’s post hoc world I find fascinating and educational. Sure, it’s not like getting autopsy results on your patient, but there is still plenty of educational value for clinicians here. It also has some unexpected features, such as insight into family motivations for wanting an autopsy, and the emotional value they contain.

Aortic rupture presenting as hip pain

Looking at this site makes me wonder why there isn’t a national autopsy registry with regular updates for clinicians on what is being discovered about the diseases we treat, mistreat, or just miss all together. In the meantime, I’m adding this blog to my favorite Flipboard feed.


Sorry, I couldn’t resist the urge to throw in some 70’s medical television on this one.

 

 

 

Design Challenge Innovators

Yesterday was our EM Innovation in Education Design challenge.  We had participants from our faculty and residents, and also some really talented medical students on their sub-internship with us.  After a presentation on 21st century concepts of learning and teaching, and a brief workshop on some new tools the teams let loose and had just a few hours to design and create.

Along the way we discovered many hidden talents and I was amazed at the skill level. The day was fun, energetic, creative, entertaining and educational.  Thanks to all the participants.

I think my favorite of the day was the ‘six second” design challenge using Vine. This series of making tools from everyday ED supplies was one of my favorites. Congratulations and thanks to  Frank FerraioliMichael SpignerRyan O’Halloran, and Thomas Yang the design team responsible for creating these.

“Where there is interest there is learning”

The EMBER Project’s Design Challenge is on!  We want to bridge the education gap, move beyond just a few adopters of FOAM, and encourage physician educators of all levels to integrate key concepts of 21st century learning into their tool box.

So we will be challenging our residents and faculty to throw away their Powerpoint slides, learn about new tools, and create core EM content that best embodies the spirit of teaching for 21st century learners. The design challenge has already begun and will culminate in an eight-hour workshop to help you develop and complete your ideas. The deadline for posting submissions on Google+ is 3pm August 19th. A panel will select the best examples of innovative EM FOAM content and highlight them on our blog.

Ahead of the day I’ve been curating many original and inspirational examples of EM FOAM content and the tools used to build them here on Flipboard (two of them are used in this post). For more on what this is all about listen to the podcast link below and check out the rules here.

Sorry this is only open to our residents and faculty, but the winners of the challenge will have their work and ideas highlighted here, so I’m looking forward to presenting some great EM FOAM content next week. If your one of our residents or faculty don’t forget to RSVP at the Google Event link so we can make sure there is enough food for everyone.

Zen Airway and Poetry Inspired by Haiku Deck

There are many reasons to love Haiku Deck. For educators it’s an easy way to free your knowledge from the Powerpoint prison on your hard drive, but it also challenges you to get to the point and hone your educational pearls into shiny drops of educational poetry.  If you are using Haiku Deck to give a talk it also re-enforces the idea the slides are only for emphasis – if you’re reading of them you’ve got too much on your slides.


So here is my latest Haiku Deck, part of a teaching module for our airway course. I was so inspired I wrote a Haiku to start things off.

Airway Haiku

The Airway is hard

How sweet the Grade One view is!

Pearls for you there are

Enjoy

Oh, I don’t have any money invested in Haiku Deck (wish I did). I just really like it.

Economist-Healthcare-Spending-Waste-Chart

I met a father yesterday in our ED who didn’t want antibiotics for his child’s otitis media.  He had read that a wait and see approach with appropriate analgesia might be a better option, and I was reminded that better stewardship of our healthcare is everyone’s concern.  It made me so happy to see a parent making such an informed choice, rather than thinking to myself (as I sometimes do) about how bad my Press Gainey score was going to be for being “the idiot doctor who didn’t want to give my child antibiotics for an ear infection”.

Our healthcare system is like recycling, carbon emissions or government spending: everyone agrees we should do more with less and be better stewards in theory, but when it comes to practice it’s always someone else’s problem. Is it because the system is so large we don’t feel that our actions matter, or do we feel entitled to use the resources we have, even if they offer no clear benefit to our patients? I don’t know the answer to this, but I do know that I still do unnecessary tests everyday in the emergency department.  Some are because of my concerns over missing disease in low risk patients, some are because I’m following “standard of care” or “best practice” based on poor evidence, some are because specialists want them or won’t admit or see the patient without them, sometimes its the end of my shift and it’s the path of least resistance.

The list of why unnecessary testing occurs is long and the vigilance required to stay on course and do what I think is right for each individual patient and the healthcare system as a whole is enormous.  In fact I would say a large percentage of my education time and practice is devoted to this one task.  The difficulty is in finding the support and resources to continue the process of informed and judicious use of medical resources against the onslaught of demands made by an avaricious, RVU/procedure driven, and risk averse healthcare industry.

The New York Times posted on a great resource for both patients and doctors that I believe is worth mentioning.  It is a list of the most commonly overused tests in seventeen different medical specialities.  Emergency Medicine is not one of the specialties listed (although it should be), however there are many emergency department relevant tests listed among the various specialty lists. I find this resource particularly helpful in stemming the tide of what other specialists ask of me in my Emergency Department (like PPI for GI bleed or pre-op echoes in cardiac patients) and in making decisions for why I’m admitting a patient.  If my major reason is an expedited workup with one of these unnecessary tests then perhaps I will think twice.

For example here are the top five recommended DON’Ts from the American College of Radiology:

1. Don’t do imaging for uncomplicated headache.

Imaging headache patients absent specific risk factors for structural disease is not likely to change management or improve outcome. Those patients with a significant likelihood of structural disease requiring immediate attention are detected by clinical screens that have been validated in many settings. Many studies and clinical practice guidelines concur. Also, incidental findings lead to additional medical procedures and expense that do not improve patient well-being.

2. Don’t image for suspected pulmonary embolism (PE) without moderate or high pre-test probability.

While deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and PE are relatively common clinically, they are rare in the absence of elevated blood d-Dimer levels and certain specific risk factors. Imaging, particularly computed tomography (CT) pulmonary angiography, is a rapid, accurate and widely available test, but has limited value in patients who are very unlikely, based on serum and clinical criteria, to have significant value. Imaging is helpful to confirm or exclude PE only for such patients, not for patients with low pre-test probability of PE.

3. Avoid admission or preoperative chest x-rays for ambulatory patients with unremarkable history and physical exam.

Performing routine admission or preoperative chest x-rays is not recommended for ambulatory patients without specific reasons suggested by the history and/or physical examination findings. Only 2 percent of such images lead to a change in management. Obtaining a chest radiograph is reasonable if acute cardiopulmonary disease is suspected or there is a history of chronic stable cardiopulmonary disease in a patient older than age 70 who has not had chest radiography within six months.

4. Don’t do computed tomography (CT) for the evaluation of suspected appendicitis in children until after ultrasound has been considered as an option.

Although CT is accurate in the evaluation of suspected appendicitis in the pediatric population, ultrasound is nearly as good in experienced hands. Since ultrasound will reduce radiation exposure, ultrasound is the preferred initial consideration for imaging examination in children. If the results of the ultrasound exam are equivocal, it may be followed by CT. This approach is cost-effective, reduces potential radiation risks and has excellent accuracy, with reported sensitivity and specificity of 94 percent.

5. Don’t recommend follow-up imaging for clinically inconsequential adnexal cysts.

Simple cysts and hemorrhagic cysts in women of reproductive age are almost always physiologic. Small simple cysts in postmenopausal women are common, and clinically inconsequential. Ovarian cancer, while typically cystic, does not arise from these benign-appearing cysts. After a good quality ultrasound in women of reproductive age, don’t recommend follow-up for a classic corpus luteum or simple cyst <5 cm in greatest diameter. Use 1 cm as a threshold for simple cysts in postmenopausal women.

The other seventeen lists are just as good and have a great deal of information relevant to our daily practice.  Of course no list trumps clinical judgement.  The environment we work in, the prevalence of a certain disease in our community, the quality of our tests, and our testing threshold should ultimately determine what we order and what we don’t, but having the support of other specialty societies to NOT do tests is a welcome resource. Along with sites like The NNT and EMLITofNOTE it is another tool to continue improving our daily practice.

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Evernote Meet Google

 

Maybe it’s a hold-over from my childhood days, but September is the month of organization.  You know, the ritual purchasing of three-ring binders, pencil holders, graph paper, all with the hope and optimism that this year things will stay organized.  Inevitably by the end of the year you’re digging around your overstuffed backpack for that piece of paper with the homework assignment on it.

Now instead of three-ring binders I hoard information online: downloading, tagging, and clipping, all in the vain hope that it will stay organized for some future use. And why not.  I spend a lot of time reading and searching online for emergency medicine information for my particular learning needs. Unfortunately, most of it collects digital dust on my hard drive or cloud – the junk drawers of the digital age.

So here is a great new tool that is actually getting me to use the information I’ve already collected.  Evernote meet Google.  Evernote now allows you to simultaneously search Google and your Evernote folder on any web browser.  Want to review subtle ECG findings suggestive of STEMI?  Type STEMI into Google and it gets you 1,700,000 hits, but now it also gives me 3 notes from my Evernote account.  Since I’ve already clipped these to my account the likelihood that they are valuable to me at the moment I want it is high.

Sure enough clicking on the Evernote icon shows me I have an article from Amal Mattu about high risk ECGs, a review of subtle STEMI patterns by Dr Smith from his ECG blog, and a link to another good online ECG education site.

Wow, my preselected information side by side with the power of Google, all at my fingertips on a web browser.  Finally, I’m ready for school (can I redo fifth grade please)?

 

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